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43 states and DC add construction jobs during the past year, but only 22 states added construction jobs between April and May amid labor and supply shortages

Forty-three states and the District of Columbia added construction jobs during the past twelve months, but momentum slowed in May with only 22 states adding jobs, according to a new analysis of federal employment data released by the Associated General Contractors (AGC) of America on June 17. Association officials said the monthly employment gains lagged in May as contractors continue to cope with labor shortages and supply chain challenges.

Data for DC, Maryland and Virginia (statewide) with the number of jobs in February, 2020, May 2021, April 2022 and May 2022 with one and 12-month gains or losses and national ranking

  • District of Columbia 15,600 14,900 15,300 15,300 0 0.0% 23 400 2.7% 26
  • Maryland 167,300 160,200 161,700 163,100 1,400 0.9% 9 2,900 1.8% 32
  • Virginia 207,300 206,100 206,200 205,100 -1,100 -0.5% 31 -1,000 -0.5% 46

“Demand for construction appears to be outpacing the availability of workers and materials in many parts of the country,” said Stephen E. Sandherr, the association’s chief executive officer. “Contractors can’t add jobs if they don’t have workers to hire or supplies to install on projects.”

Construction employment increased in 43 states and the District of Columbia between May 2021 and May 2022 and declined in seven states. Texas added the most construction jobs for the year (54,600 jobs, 7.5 percent), followed by California (27,800 jobs, 3.1 percent) and Tennessee (14,200 jobs, 10.6 percent). New Mexico had the largest percentage gain (12.8 percent, 6,000 jobs), followed by Tennessee and Rhode Island (10.2 percent, 2,000 jobs).

Kentucky shed the most construction jobs over 12 months (-2,300 jobs, -2.9 percent), followed by Arkansas (-2,000 jobs, -3.6 percent) and Hawaii (-1,600 jobs, -4.3 percent). The largest percentage losses were in Hawaii, Arkansas and Kentucky as well.

In May, only 22 states added construction jobs, 25 states lost jobs, and there was no change in three states and the District of Columbia. Texas added the most construction jobs over the month (10,600 jobs, 1.4 percent), followed by California (7,100 jobs, 0.8 percent) and Minnesota (4,100 jobs, 3.2 percent). Minnesota had the largest percentage gain, followed by Tennessee (1.8 percent, 2,600 jobs) and Texas.

New York lost the most construction jobs last month (-5,100 jobs, -1.3 percent), followed by Florida (-4,000 jobs, -0.7 percent) and Ohio (-3,700 jobs, -1.6 percent). North Dakota (-3.0 percent, -800 jobs) and Wyoming (-3.0 percent, -700 jobs) had the largest percentage losses, followed by Iowa (-2.6 percent, -2,100 jobs).

Association officials urged public leaders to continue investing in programs to inform and prepare workers about high-paying construction career opportunities. They said too few students and workers are even aware of the many opportunities that exist in the construction industry. And they pushed the Biden administration to remove remaining tariffs on construction materials and do more to ease supply chain challenges impacting the availability of many different types of construction materials.

“Contractors need people and products to build projects, and the supply of both is very constrained right now,” said Sandherr, the association’s chief executive officer. “Exposing more workers to high-paying construction career opportunities and fixing the supply chain will help put more people to work in the industry.”

Mark Buckshon
Mark Buckshonhttps://washingtonconstructionnews.com
Mark Buckshon is the publisher and interim editor of Washington Construction News. He is also president of the Construction News and Report Group of Companies. He combines a journalism and business background, and has published construction trade publications for more than 30 years, after an earlier career in journalism, which culminated when he lived through the transition from Rhodesia to Zimbabwe in 1978-80 as a sub-editor for the Bulawayo Chronicle and a correspondent for a Canadian news service.

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