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AIA applauds NCARB for eliminating the Rolling Clock

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) says it has the decision by the Board of Directors of the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) for eliminating the “rolling clock” to architecture licensure.

Data indicates that the rolling clock policy is a potential impediment to licensure, with disproportionate effects on women and people from racially and ethnically diverse backgrounds, the AIA says in a Feb. 23 statement. AIA has held ongoing discussions with NCARB in support of the removal of the rolling clock policy to advance a more inclusive future for the architecture profession.

AIA EVP/CEO Lakisha Ann Woods announced to applause in February during the AIA Leadership Summit in Washington, DC that the association would be launching a campaign to collect stories about how the rolling clock has affected individuals’ paths to licensure.

“The U.S. needs more licensed architects to advance a healthy, safe, and thriving built environment, and AIA believes individuals deserve flexibility as they pursue licensure,” Woods said. “This change in policy will allow more opportunities for individuals to achieve that goal.”

Moving forward, AIA’s “Stop the Clock” campaign will encourage people to share their stories of how the rolling clock has affected their own path to licensure to ensure this effort is standardized across all jurisdictions. “AIA looks forward to working with NCARB and the AIA Component network to collect and share those stories,” the statement says.

Mark Buckshon
Mark Buckshonhttps://washingtonconstructionnews.com
Mark Buckshon is the publisher and interim editor of Washington Construction News. He is also president of the Construction News and Report Group of Companies. He combines a journalism and business background, and has published construction trade publications for more than 30 years, after an earlier career in journalism, which culminated when he lived through the transition from Rhodesia to Zimbabwe in 1978-80 as a sub-editor for the Bulawayo Chronicle and a correspondent for a Canadian news service.

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